Day 26 of vegan recipe challenge: cooking with friends

Perhaps “Cooking with Friends” could be the “Words with Friends” for the new year. Less wordy, less competitive, and the outcome literally puts food on the table.

Yesterday afternoon, my friend Jessi and I took on our own culinary friendship date. During the process, we touched on our own challenges when cooking with our partners: the improv chef versus the stick-to-the-recipe, the “this is how I do it” mindset [totally guilty of this one], so for a friend to be willing to chop, simmer, and saute along side you, I chalk that up to a pretty big deal.

We started with Angela Liddon’s Thai-Inspired Hydrating Cucumber Salad with Roasted Spiced Chickpeas.. I showed some self-restraint and allowed the chickpeas to cook longer than I had previously, giving them even more crunch (and subsequently keeping fewer on the baking sheet as I snuck a couple each time I walked by – oops!). Below, find the recipes from the Oh She Glows blog for both the salad and the roasted chickpeas.

Bowl2You will be quenched, my friends.

Thai-Inspired Cucumber Salad with Roasted Spiced Chickpeas

Yield: about 3 portions

Dressing:

  • 1/2 cup seasoned rice vinegar
  • 1.5-2 tablespoons natural cane sugar, to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt

Salad:

  • 2 medium field cucumbers
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1 cup diced red onion
  • 1/4 cup roughly chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup chopped roasted peanuts, for garnish
  • Roasted spiced chickpeas (recipe follows)

1. Whisk dressing ingredients together in a small bowl and adjust to taste. Feel free to add more sweetener if you prefer. Set aside.

2. Peel cucumbers, slice off the ends, and slice in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds with a small spoon (see photo in post if necessary). Slice halves into 1/8-inch “half moons” and toss into a large bowl. If your cucumbers are really big you can slice the half-moons in half as well.

3. Dice the red pepper and red onion and add into bowl. Roughly chop cilantro and add into bowl. Pour in all the dressing and toss to combine. Let this salad sit for about 30 minutes in the fridge, tossing every 10 minutes or so to help the dressing soak in.

4. Meanwhile, prepare the roasted chickpeas (if desired). Recipe follows.

5. Portion into bowls and top with peanuts and roasted chickpeas (optional). Serve immediately.

Roasted Spiced Chickpeas

Yield: 1.5 cups chickpeas or 3 (1/2 cup) servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 (15-oz) can chickpeas (or 1.5 cups cooked)
  • 1/2 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground turmeric

1. Preheat oven to 400F and line a medium baking sheet with a couple pieces of paper towel.

2. Rinse and drain the chickpeas and place onto paper towel. Add a couple paper towels on top and roll the chickpeas around until completely dry. This helps them crisp up in the oven.

3. Add the chickpeas into a medium mixing bowl and stir in the oil until coated. Now stir in the rest of the seasonings.

4. Discard paper towel and line baking sheet with parchment paper. Add chickpeas back onto the baking sheet.

5. Roast at 400F for 20 minutes. Give the pan a gentle shake to stir the chickpeas and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until golden and lightly charred on the bottom. I roast for a full 40 minutes because I like them on the crispy side, but keep an eye on them as oven temps vary.

6. Cool for 5 minutes or so and then top on your salad. They will lose their crispness quickly so these are best enjoyed immediately. If need be, you can freeze them once fully cooled, reheat them in the oven for about 5 minutes or so to bring back the crispiness.

But, that’s not all!

That was just the starter set. We jumped over to Isa Does It for the Curried Peanut Sauce Bowl with Tofu & Kale. Recently, I reveled in my love for peanut butter. If you have the same lust in your heart, you will MELT over this sauce. After making it, I would put it on anything (even a bird):

No, not really a bird. But as pizza sauce? Yes. On salads? Yes. Over a bowl of quinoa and veggies? Yes. On ANYTHING? Almost yes.

Curried Peanut Sauce Bowl with Tofu & Kale
Serves 4
Total time: 25 minutes; active time: 25 minutes

For the tofu:
1 tablespoon olive oil (I used peanut)
14 ounces extra-firm tofu, cut into 3/4-inch cubes
1/4 teaspoon salt

For the sauce and kale:
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup water
1/2 cup smooth peanut butter (!!!)
2 teaspoons curry powder (see note)
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons tamari (can sub soy sauce)
2 tablespoons agave nectar
1 teaspoon sriracha
1 bunch kale, stems removed, torn into pieces
Pinch of salt

For serving:
4 cups brown rice, quinoa, or rice noodles
Sriracha (optional)
Fresh cilantro (optional)

Note: Isa recommended S&B Oriental Curry Powder. I could not find it so I used a traditional curry powder. If you can find the S&B brand, the star anise in it supposedly really shines. It’s on my list!

Prepare the tofu:
You’ll need a cast-iron pan, or something nonstick that can take very high heat. Preheat the pan over high heat. Once the pan is good and hot, apply the oil in a thin layer. Add the cubed tofu and sprinkle with the salt. The tofu should immediately sizzle when it hits the hot pan; otherwise, turn up the heat. Cook for about 7 minutes, tossing often, until it’s nicely browned.

Prepare the sauce:
Preheat a 2-quart saucepan over medium-low heat and add the oil. Saute the ginger and garlic in the oil for about 30 seconds. Add the water and deglaze the pan, then turn up the heat a bit. Once the water is warm, add the peanut butter, curry powder, rice vinegar, tamari, agave, and sriracha. As the ingredients heat up, the peanut butter will blend smoothly into the water as you stir. It should take 5 minutes or so, stirring often. Taste for seasonings, especially to see if you like the level of curry, and add more if you like.

Prepare the kale:
Get your steaming apparatus ready. Place the kale in the steamer and sprinkle on a pinch of salt. Steam for about 5 minutes, until soft but still with a little spring to it.

To assemble:
Spoon the rice into bowls. Add the kale, then the tofu, and smother in the peanut sauce. Top with sriracha and cilantro, if you like.

How differently our three bowls turned out:

Bowl4Aaron

Bowl3Jessi

Bowl1Katie’s…and the worst photo (le sigh)

Have you cooked with any of your friends? Was it a success? Or is it still something we don’t talk about?

Day 21 of vegan recipe challenge: only 18 more days to go

Admission: taking on this self-imposed challenge to post a vegan recipe through the end of January is not easy for me.

The difficulty doesn’t stem from having access to excllent recipes. It all boils down to time. How I want to spend my time, how I actually spend my time, how I “should” spend my time. As I’ve mused before, I also feel much more burned out sitting in front of a computer these days. I essentially spend my working day basking in the glow of the online realm (the irony of working for the environment – not being in it enough!)

Still, it’s nice to be uncomfortable with meeting deadlines. I still feel that way, at times, with running. This past Sunday’s 14-miler didn’t feel bad physically, but it managed to suck my mental energy out completely. Perhaps it was my overwhelming tiredness of cold weather. Perhaps it was because I managed to get a little lost on the trail. I still completed the run, in my goal pace time. And next weekend’s runs will be better. Challenge is healthy.

In the ode to my lust for all things crunchy, I’m sharing another Oh She Glows recipe that I made with friend Samara for a double date night a few months ago. Cooking with friends is FUN and certainly not done enough. Not only does it make the meal taste even more satisfying, but you have dedicated time to catch-up over chopping onions and making quinoa. I already have additional cooking with friends dates scheduled for this month and hope to add more over the year.

Crispy Quinoa Cakes
Makes 12 cakes
Prep time: 25 minutes; Cook time: 25 minutes
Gluten free; vegan

quinoa cakesPhoto: Angela Liddon, Oh She Glows

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups cooked quinoa
  • 2 tablespoons ground flax + 6 tablespoons water
  • 1 cup destemmed and finely chopped kale
  • 1/2 cup rolled oats, ground into a flour (use certified gluten-free if necessary)
  • 1/2 cup finely grated sweet potato
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons finely diced onion
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon runny tahini paste
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons red or white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt, or to taste
  • 3 tablespoons gluten-free all-purpose flour (I used King Arthur) or regular all-purpose flour
  • red pepper flakes, to taste

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Mix the ground flax and water in a small bowl and set aside for 5 minutes or so to thicken.
  3. Combine all ingredients together in a large bowl, including the flax mixture and the 1.5 cups cooked quinoa. Stir well until the mixture comes together. Don’t forget the flour because it helps bind the patties.
  4. Shape mixture into 1/4-cup patties with wet hands. Pack tightly so they hold together better. Place on baking sheet.
  5. Bake for 15 minutes, then carefully flip cakes, and bake for another 8-10 minutes until golden and firm.
  6. Cool for 5 minutes on the sheet and then enjoy!
  7. Store leftovers in a container in the fridge for up to 5-6 days. To reheat, preheat a skillet over medium heat, add a bit of oil, and cook patties for about 3 minutes per side, or until heated through.

Tips: 1) To cook quinoa, rinse 1 cup uncooked quinoa in a fine mesh strainer. Place quinoa in a medium pot and cover with 1 1/2 cups water. Bring to a low boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and then cover with a tight fitting lid. Simmer covered for 14-17 minutes until most of the water is absorbed and the quinoa is light and fluffy. Remove from heat, fluff with a fork, and then place lid back on to steam for another 4-5 minutes. Note that this makes almost 3 cups of cooked quinoa and you only need 1 1/2 cups for this recipe, so you will have leftover quinoa (which is never a bad thing if you ask me!).

2) To make oat flour, add the oats into a high speed blender and blend on the highest speed until a fine flour forms. You can also use store-bought oat flour if desired.

We paired these cakes with a salad (if my memory recalls correctly), which provided a nice balance. Have you ever “cooked with friends”? Would you?

Day sixteen of vegan recipe challenge: a Sunday cooking investment pays off

Confession: I had never – even in my pre-vegan days – made enchiladas. And, growing up in the Southwest, making enchiladas were practically a rite of passage. Regardless, I still ate them like they were hot cakes – covered in cheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeze (I really wanted to emphasize the layers of cheese typically covering this dish. Can you feel the gooey weight?)

SO, this past Sunday, while the Detroit Lions battled the Dallas Cowboys upstairs (to no avail in the land of football playoffs), I took on another Veganomicon recipe: Potato and Kale Enchiladas.

onions
Sweat baby sweat

Fair warning: it took me about 30 – 45 minutes longer than the hour time projection from the cookbook. I can certainly take the fall for being a little slower than the average bear in the kitchen, but it was one of those meals where I wished that I had a cooking partner or a few additional limbs to help out. Still, it was worth every minute. We enjoyed the leftovers for the next two days. AND THE ENCHILADA SAUCE is just divine – rich and spicy and I will make this and pour it on other dishes (I ate it directly out of the pot multiple times).

INGREDIENTS:
Enchilada Chile Sauce:
2 Tbs grapeseed oil or olive oil
1 onion, diced
3 large green chilies (such as Anaheim or Italian-style long green peppers), roasted, seeded, peeled and coarsely chopped (I did roast my own chilies – oh my! So much fresh flavor. If you have to use canned chilies, go for it. If you can roast them the day before, do it! I chose not to peel mine either)
2-3 tsp Ancho chili pepper power (I used chipotle because I bought the wrong spice – it was still good)
1-1/2 tsp cumin
1 tsp marjoram or Mexican oregano (epazote)
1 28-oz can diced tomatoes, roasted preferred
1 tsp sugar (I used agave)
1-1/2 tsp salt

Potato and Kale Filling:
1 lb waxy potatoes (Yukon gold or red) – I used Yukon
1/2 lb kale, washed, trimmed and chopped finely
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 tsp cumin
1/4 C vegetable broth or water
3 Tbs lime juice
1/4 C toasted pumpkin seeds
1 1/2 tsp salt (I used just one teaspoon – I still found this dish salty so I would reduce further in future making sessions or remove it altogether)
12 – 14 corn tortillas

Directions: [Note: I am pulling these instructions from Epicurian Vegan because they are FABULOUS. Check out this site for so many more amazing recipes!]

Preheat oven to 375. Use a 11.5″x7.5″ casserole dish. To save yourself a headache: first, get the kale washed, trimmed and chopped, and peel and dice the potatoes.

To prepare the sauce, saute the onion and oil in a large skillet over medium heat, about 4-7 minutes. Add remaining sauce ingredients, bring to a simmer.

Remove from the heat, let cool, then taste it to adjust seasoning, if necessary. Puree in an immersion or regular blender until smooth. (I used the food processor). – I used my blender!

To prepare the filling, boil the potatoes until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and set aside. (This next step, I recommend doing while the potatoes are cooking) Cook the grapeseed oil and minced garlic in a sauce pot (I used the same skillet from the sauce–just washed it out) over medium heat until garlic just begins to brown. Add the kale, sprinkle with some salt and stir often. Partially cover the pot and steam the kale about 4-6 minutes. Then add the potatoes, broth (or water), lime juice, pumpkin seeds, and salt. Mash the potatoes a little bit with a spoon. Cook another 3-4 minutes.

To create these fabulous enchiladas . . . finally. . . the recipe says to ladle some sauce in a shallow dish and a heated griddle. Seriously?! My kitchen already looked like the Swedish Chef had made a 10-course meal in it and adding another pan to my already-crowded workspace just wasn’t going to happen. Plus, the tortillas I used are perfect for rolling—they’re soft enough already that they won’t crack. So if you wish to torture yourself, this is what the original recipe says: Ladle a bit of sauce onto the bottom of the casserole dish (ok, I did do that). Take a corn tortilla, place it on the heated griddle for 30 seconds, flip over and heat until soft and pliable. Drop the tortilla into the sauce and cover it completely with sauce. Place it in the casserole dish and layer it with another heat, sauce-covered tortilla (or use one. Or don’t do it that way at all). Seriously, too messy and labor-intensive. Fill with potato filling and roll up. Ok, I took the easy epicurean vegan way. After adding a layer of sauce on the bottom, I scooped some filling into my already soft and wonderfully pliable tortilla, rolled it up and placedit in the pan. That easy. Continue until the pan is filled.

Katie interjection: Here’s my “enchilada making station.” And I definitely did not heat up my tortillas because at this point, I was also wiped and just wanted to eat:

stationAlmost looks like cinnamon applesauce. I need to learn how to take better food photos.

After reserving about 1-1/2 cups of the sauce, pour the rest over the enchiladas. Now, I can’t imagine enchiladas without cheese, so I sprinkled some Daiya cheese shreds on top. – I left mine cheese-less and I still thought they were great. Will definitely try with cheese next time!

Cover with foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove foil and bake another 10-15 minutes. Top individual servings with the extra sauce (that you’ve warmed up). You may not recognize your kitchen once these are in the oven, but at least while they bake, you’ll have time to reclaim your space

So, here’s what mine looked like –

enchilNo wonder they grow so much cheese on it. I may not have let them “cool” long enough before I attacked with my spatula. The end result = messchiladas.

I even threw some avocados on top during my lunch reheats. Yum. Yum. Yum.

Day thirteen of vegan recipe challenge: oogling for Udon

While musing on the #veganuary challenge during a run last weekend, I decided to take on breaking down the barriers that surround a vegan staple (and, if done right, an overall delight): tofu. Tofu! Too many people have experienced bad tofu: gummy, watery, and bland. But, when done well, tofu can bring down a house (it may also burn down a house if you are not careful when frying but that’s a simple fact of cooking with oil. Fire extinguishers are key!)

So, I decided to host a “Tofu Done 5 Ways” gathering later this month both to introduce tofu in new ways to some friends and to glean their knowledge and experience in working with this powerful protein. What are the 5 ways, you ask? We’ll do some simmered tofu (either in soup or an simmering sauce), fried tofu, baked tofu, pureed tofu, and raw tofu. For the raw tofu, I decided that I wanted to make sushi. But, there’s a catch:

I don’t know how to make sushi.

I do know how to eat it though. Fortunately, through the insight of social media, I discerned my friend Chelsea is a sushi-rolling master. So, I asked her if she would teach me her ways, sensei. She happily agreed, so we’ll be knocking that out later today. To prepare for this endeavor, I visited a foodies gem in the haunts of an old Circuit City:

LiMingNo more computers here. Just crazy amounts of food.

Why I hadn’t shopped at Li Ming’s Global Market more frequently is beyond me, but that will change for 2015. Rows and rows of fresh vegetables, tofu, and simmer sauces labeled in languages far beyond my linguistic grasps. After selecting the nori and other key sushi-making project ingredients, I sought the pièce de rĂ©sistance for a dish from Veganomicon: fresh Udon noodles. I had never worked with fresh noodles before (a travesty!) and was overwhelmed by the sheer options of Udon noodles staring back at me. Some where seasoned with various animal-based proteins, so I carefully selected a straight-up-now-tell-me packet. And, after a few chops, flips, and minutes, this is what I was left with:

Udon2Slurpy goodness.

With some added bok choy (because who can resist giant bags of bok choy for $2?!), I found this recipe to be sublime. Excellent broth – the ginger/garlic combination is present but not overwhelming. This miso (which I also bought at Li Ming’s for an obnoxiously inexpensive price) tickled the tongue. Aaron and I took down the entire recipe (yes, it serves four) last night. What I also liked about the fresh udon noodles is that it came in four-individual packs, so we still have two left in our fridge, waiting for their own bath in the pool

Udon with Shiitake Mushrooms and Kale in Miso Broth
Serves 4; Time: 35 minutes

1/2 pound fresh udon noodles or dried udon noodles
2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I used sunflower)
1 medium-size red onion, sliced into thin half-mooons
4 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems trimmed, sliced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons ginger, minced
2 tablespoons mirin (optional)
2 cups water
3 tablespoons miso (see note below)
4 cups chopped kale
2 teaspoons soy sauce, or to taste

Note: In this recipe, Isa & Terry used a strong, dark miso (which I did too). If you are using a light, mellow miso, you may want to add another tablespoon or so.

Bring a pot of water to a boil. Cook the udon according to the package directions (about 10 minutes for dried; 3 – 4 minutes for fresh). When done, drain and rinse with cool water until ready to use.
Meanwhile, preheat a large skilled over medium heat. Saute the onion and mushrooms in the oil for 5 to 7 minutes, until the mushrooms are tender and the onions are softened but still have some crunch. Add the garlic and ginger, and saute for another minute.

Add the mirin, water, and miso, and bring to a gentle boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and add the kale. Toss the mixture around with tongs until the kale has wilted. Add the noodles and use a paste spoon to stir them into the broth for about 2 minutes.

Divide the udon and vegetables among bowls and spoon some broth over each serving.

Then, slurp away, my friends. Slurp away. I just steamed the bok choy and threw in one for some additional green vegetable love.

Udon1

And, one additional food-related plus for today. During my Target meat-alternative excursion, I discovered this brand of veggie burger:

vburger

After yesterday morning’s run, I tossed it into a pan for some protein fuel. YUM! Sweet Earth nailed it. It has a nice crunch on the outside, and I definitely could taste the Middle Eastern spices. I will gladly try out some of the other flavors.

Day six of vegan recipe challenge: what the kale

In 2014, what has been hotter than Nicki Minaj, selfies, and the podcast Serial?

Kale.

Kale is still reigning as the “it” food. Will it be resigned to the “so last year” list in 2015? I doubt it. No only is the vegetable packed with vitamins and antioxidants, it’s versatile enough when someone says something ridiculous like – “I don’t like kale” – you can say: “But you haven’t tried it like this yet.” Maybe they still won’t like kale, but at least you’ve hit them with your best shot.

festive

Behold! A kale salad of wonder that christened our dining room table this Thanksgiving. No surprise: it’s another Angela Liddon masterpiece found in her first and latest cookbook – “The Oh She Glows Cookbook.”

The splotch marks of the pomegranate juice in my cookbook show that while a mess may occur, it’s so worth it. Who wants a clean cookbook?

splotchThe war of cooking takes its toll

Festival Kale Salad with sweet apple-cinnamon vinaigrette & pecan Parmesan
Serves 4 to 6
Prep Time: 20 to 25 minutes; Cook time: 7 to 9 minutes
gluten-free, soy-free, refined sugar-free, grain-free

For the pecan Parmesan:
1/2 cup pecans, toasted
1 1/2 teaspoon nutritional yeast
1 1/2 to 3 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon fine grain salt

For the dressing:
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice (from 1/2 lemon)
2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil or grapeseed oil
2 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce
1/2 teaspoon minced fresh peeled ginger

To Assemble:
1 bunch kale, destemmed and leaves torn into bite-size pieces
1 apple, cored and finely chopped
1.4 cup dried cranberries
1.2 cup pomegranate arils (from about 1/2 pomegranate)

1) Make the Pecan Parmesan. Preheat the oven to 300F (150C). Spread the pecans in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet and toast in the oven for 7 to 9 minutes, until lightly golden and fragrant. Set aside to cool for 5 minutes.

2) In a mini food processor, combine the toasted pecans, nutritional yeast, oil, and salt and process until crumbly and combined. (You can also chop the pecans by hand and mix everything in a small bowl.) Set aside.

3) Make the Dressing: In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, lemon juice, maple syrup, cinnamon, salt, oil, applesauce, and ginger until combined.

4) To assemble the salad, place the kale in a large salad bowl and pour on the dressing. With your hands, massage the dressing into the kale leaves until fully coasted. Let stand for at least 30 minutes. The kale will soften slightly during this time.

5) Top the kale with the apple, cranberries, and pomegranate arils. Spring the Pecan Parmesan over the salad just before serving.

Voila! Easy, delicious salad with a nice healthy crunch, some sweetness – and it’s so pretty!

Day five of recipe challenge: post-holiday cleanup

Strewn wrapping paper. Needles dotting the carpet with its full-front green assault. The post-cookie/cocktail/what did I eat at 1am while hiding presents hangover in effect.

picture-perfectThe Griswold family Christmas clean-up?

The first challenge is: don’t beat yourself up if you did get off track. I definitely hung up my exercise shoes on Christmas Day. Not that I didn’t want to run (the sun was FINALLY out!) or be active, but there is something so rare and special as the time of togetherness. How often are you truly together – and present – with the ones you love? Distance, devices, and distractions keep us from achieving this more often than not, and I elected yesterday to be as faithful to the idea as possible.

The second notion to keep in mind: I’ve learned from eating a plant-based diet that – it is in fact harder to fall off the wagon than before. Sure, there are “bad foods” available to vegans (I still cannot believe Oreos are vegan). But, after time putting wholesome foods into your body that you prepare, it’s much harder to slip down that slope of processed food. Now, beer, wine and cocktails on the other hand…

Introduce, the Ohe She Glows “Eat Your Green Detox Soup” – a way to feel better, from the inside out. Put down that gingerbread cookie! Put away the nog. Or, keep it out a for a couple more days. This soup doesn’t have to just be for post-mass consumption: it’s good whenever.

Eat Your Greens Detox Soup
Serves 3
Prep time: 25 minutes; Cook time: 20 to 30 minutes
gluten-free, nut free, soy-free, sugar-free, grain-free

1 1/2 teaspoons (7mL) coconut oil or olive oil
1 sweet onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
3 cups (750 mL) sliced cremini or white button mushrooms (about 8 ounces)
1 cup (250 mL) chopped carrots
2 cups (500 mL) chopped broccoli florets)
Fine-grain sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 1/2 to 3 teaspoons (7 to 15 mL) grated peeled fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon (2mL) ground tumeric
2 teaspoon (10 mL) ground cumin
1/8 teaspoon (0.5 mL) ground cinnamon
5 cups (1.25 L) vegetable broth
2 large nori seaweed sheets, cut into 1-inch strips (optional)
2 cups (500 mL) torn kale leaves
Fresh lemon juice, for serving (optional)

1) In a large saucepan, heat the oil over medium heat. Ad the onion and garlic and saute for about 5 minutes, until the onion is soft and translucent.

2) Add the mushrooms, carrots, and broccoli and stir to combine. Season generously with salt and pepper and saute for 5 minutes more.

3) Sit in the ginger, tumeric, cumin, and cinnamon, and saute for 1 to 2 minutes, until fragrant.

4) Add the broth and stir to combine. Bring the mixture to a boil and then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the vegetables are tender, 10 to 20 minutes.

5) Just before serving, stir in the nori (if using) and kale and cook until wilted. Season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice, if desired.

C’est bon!

Eat_Your_Greens_Detox_Soup1Photo via Oh She Glows – one of the best blogs/recipe sites EVER